Rafael Pampillón. Professor. IE Business School

30 May 2017

Achieving a United States of Europe requires greater levels of integration in terms of banking, fiscal policy, labor law and institutions. These ideas have found a strategic champion in the form of France’s new president, Macron.

Ignacio de la Torre. Professor. IE Business School

4 April 2017

The increase in interest rates in the US will have knock-on effects in Asia and Europe. If the ECB starts to taper quantitative easing, there will be more rises in interest rates, making it too expensive to change to a fixed rate mortgage.

Ignacio de la Torre. Professor. IE Business School

28 February 2017

Europe rounded off 2016 with a higher level of growth than the US, something not seen for a decade. Moreover, Europe has more solid building blocks on which to build future growth.

Rafael Pampillón. Professor. IE Business School

31 January 2017

The new year has brought uncertainties that effect the entire planet, but  it has also brought revised forecasts that point toward greater economic growth.

Ignacio de la Torre. Professor. IE Business School

20 January 2017

As one of the greatest historians in Ancient Greece once said, the combination of a hegemonic power and a rising power leads to war, because the former feels threatened.

Rafael Pampillón. Professor. IE Business School

1 November 2016

While public deficit and unemployment figures are still high Spain needs to avoid a big rise in wage levels, which will only serve to make unemployment levels worse. 

Ignacio de la Torre. Professor. IE Business School

1 November 2016

Rising life expectancies and plummeting birth rates have given a new meaning to the literary term for Europe, “the old continent.” 

Ignacio de la Torre. Professor. IE Business School

22 September 2016

Several central Banks are sending out the first signals of the beginning of the end of the lax monetary policy that caused the biggest financial bubble in the last few decades.

Gayle Allard. Professor. IE Business School

1 August 2016

Brexit is both a cause and a consequence. It is the cause of the impact that this decision will have for the whole of Europe, but it is also the consequence of the failure of the governments of the old continent.

José Piquer. Executive Director. Undergraduate Studies International Relations. IE University

1 August 2016

After a historic second general election, Spain still has no party with a clear majority that would permit it to form a government, and the result is two scenarios that test the old new policy.

Ignacio de la Torre. Professor. IE Business School

1 August 2016

Spain will once again lead economic growth among big Western countries, in spite of those who predict that the opposite will happen. Here’s why.

Gonzalo Garland. Professor. IE Business School

1 June 2016

Inflation is no longer the great enemy it was. Now the challenges are driving economic growth, reducing unemployment, and reducing the deficit and public debt. Hence we need to talk about deflation. 

Ignacio de la Torre. Professor. IE Business School

26 May 2016

The Brexit referendum blocked a rise in interest rates by the FED in June. But the arguments in favor of putting off said rise are fast disappearing, and economic realities all point to it happening in the near future.

Ignacio de la Torre. Professor. IE Business School

18 May 2016

There are currently a series of financial aberrations in existence, such as the fact that there are ten billions’ worth of bonds at negative rates or that the Spanish treasury is financing itself at rates lower than in the United States, which point to a rise in interest rates in the near future.

Ignacio de la Torre. Professor. IE Business School

29 April 2016

Watch out. The risks in monetary policy are growing, which could threaten the valuation of a large number of assets.  

Ignacio de la Torre. Professor. IE Business School

30 March 2016

Contrary to what the media says, capital is not fleeing Spain. Rather, thanks to the ECB’s monetary policy, Spanish firms are funding themselves using cheaper loans.

Rafael Pampillón. Professor. IE Business School

28 March 2016

Recent growth forecasts do not justify the panic that we are seeing in world markets, and still less in the Spanish market.

Fernando Fernández. Professor. IE Business School

1 March 2016

Anchoring Spain in the euro, creating Jobs, promoting equal opportunities, reforming the social welfare system... the similarities between the aims of Spain’s two main political parties, PP and PSOE, are greater than they may suggest.

Ignacio de la Torre. Professor. IE Business School

29 February 2016

As on many previous occasions the market is reacting by selling first, and asking questions later, when in reality the world is not heading for recession.

Fernando Fernández. Professor. IE Business School

29 January 2016

The results of Spain’s latest election has left a parliament that is so broken, that the medicine needed to put the pieces together and heal the country’s wounds  can only be administered by a great coalition.

Ignacio de la Torre. Professor. IE Business School

21 January 2016

In spite of a turbulent start to 2016 the world will grow this year more than the last one, but this improvement hides a serious threat, the much put upon ten-year bond.

Rafael Pampillón. Professor. IE Business School

15 January 2016

History shows us that falling oil prices caused by excess supply lead to cutbacks in prospecting and extraction that lead to prices going back up again.

Ignacio de la Torre. Professor. IE Business School

30 November 2015

The behavior of house prices depends on the type of house, its location, and size… but right now property prices in Spain and elsewhere are generally on the rise, and are likely to continue to climb over the next few years.

Gayle Allard. Professor. IE Business School

30 November 2015

The first challenge facing the political party that wins the upcoming Spanish elections will be to create jobs - but they have to be quality jobs, and that means getting rid of red tape, complicated contracts, and abusive practices.

Ignacio de la Torre. Professor. IE Business School

30 October 2015

“Valió la pena (It was worth it)” is the title of the recently published book featuring the memoirs of Jorge Dezcallar. It was certainly worth writing, given that it enables us read the recent history of Spain from a perspective based on the truth.

Rafael Pampillón y Cristina Mª de Haro. Professors. IE Business School

29 October 2015

The latest winner of the Nobel Prize for Economics, Angus Deaton, is optimistic about the future evolution of world welfare, because, even though there is still a great deal left to do, the economic situation is heading in the right direction

Ignacio de la Torre. Professor. IE Business School

30 September 2015

The seismic changes taking place in China will have devastating knock on effects in many emerging economies, while western countries will remain largely unaffected.  

Rafael Pampillón. Professor. IE Business School

22 September 2015

The Asian giant is leaving an export and investment-led growth model behind and embracing another more oriented to private consumption. The metamorphosis will be worth the effort.

Fernando Fernández. Professor. IE Business School

29 July 2015

Regardless of how much we talk about it, Greece is only the tip of the iceberg, under which lurks a massive ice mountain made up of the real problem – a European Union that is only half built.

Rafael Pampillón. Professor. IE Business School

29 July 2015

Spain’s general state Budget for 2016 should try to achieve a reduction in the national debt and include more cuts in public spending. 

Ignacio de la Torre. Professor. IE Business School

16 July 2015

The Greek tragedy is the story of a load of bunkum written and presented by the Mediterranean country and its creditors in an effort to escape their true destiny. But the time has come to face up to the truth. 

Rafael Pampillón. Professor. IE Business School

29 June 2015

The industrial production index, the consumer confidence indicator… more and more data is pointing to the fact that Spanish families are starting to notice the economic recovery in their pockets.

Ignacio de la Torre. Professor. IE Business School

24 June 2015

I have always said that the capacity of a politician to take bad decisions is inversely proportional to a country’s debt as a percentage of GDP. And Spain currently owes more than ever before in its history…

Ignacio de la Torre. Porfessor. IE Business School

15 May 2015

For the first time in seven years, Europe is starting to show signs of solid growth, bringing an improvement in the economy that will be surprisingly bullish, and which is set to gather pace over the next few years.

Rafael Pampillón and Cristina Mª de Haro. IE Business School and Universidad San Pablo (CEU)

8 May 2015

Economic figures published in recent weeks serve to underscore the recovery of Spain’s economy and brings with it the hope that the resulting impact will mean that citizens will soon start to feel the difference in their pockets.

Rafael Pampillón. Professor. IE Business School

22 April 2015

Spain is a country of emigrants, and will continue to be for the time being. Although this is a difficult situation from a personal perspective, it can have a positive outcome in economic terms.

Mikel Aguirre. Professor. IE Business School

14 April 2015

Plummeting oil prices have direct consequences for the whole world, and many underlying reasons.

Ignacio de la Torre. Professor, IE Business School

19 March 2015

Young people with temporary work contracts with no security, who are also required to make provision for pensions and paying a debt they played no part in creating, have been left abandoned by the massive hypocrisy of our system

 

Manuel Bermejo. Professor. IE Business School

18 March 2015

Family businesses are an ethical mirror in which we should all take a look, because their management model is based on sharing a project and a set of values which are what give a sense of transcendence to the family legacy

 

Rafael Pampillón Professor. IE Business School and Universidad San Pablo CEU

23 February 2015

The incipient but increasing signs of economic recovery in Spain needs a clear commitment to R&D in order to consolidate and build on a strong industrial base

 

Ignacio de la Torre. Professor. Business School

27 January 2015

While the eurozone, led by Spain, will exceed forecasts, the US will raise interest rates earlier than expected and China will give the world an unpleasant surprise, pushing the price of raw materials down even further.

Francisco Navarro, Director, Global Corporation Center, EY and IE Business School

26 January 2015

Russia’s setbacks are a clear example of how it is no longer possible to compete with just one product. Raising barriers to entry requires large doses of technology and added value.

Rafael Pampillón and Cristina Mª de Haro. IE Business School and Universidad San Pablo (CEU)

20 January 2015

The falling value of the euro is strengthening exports and attracting foreign investment. If it brings real economic recovery, the result will be a virtuous circle of growth.

Peter Fisk. Visiting Professor. IE Business

15 December 2014

A new generation of business organizations is showing companies how to adapt to continuous technological and economic change.

Ignacio de la Torre. Professor. IE Business School

30 October 2014

The current state of the eurozone economy is like a mirror image of that of Spain a year ago, which means we can reasonably expect to see growth in the coming year.

Francisco Navarro. Vice Dean. IE Business School

30 September 2014

Globalization has led to a convergence of markets where firms have to compete on a cost basis. The challenge lies in developing societies where we can all work in a decent and fair environment.

Manuel Romera. Professor. IE Business School

30 June 2014

The real problem with so-called tax havens is not a question of tax competition, but rather the lack of both transparency and control of criminal activity in these territories. 

Ignacio de la Torre. Professor. IE Business School

26 June 2014

How fast is the Federal Reserve going to taper stimulus measures? Too fast and it could cause another recession, too slow and it could fuel high levels of inflation. 

Fernando Fernández. Professor. IE Business School

30 April 2014

Spain’s tax system has proved to be ineffective because in spite of levying high rates of tax the amount of money collected is relatively low. In the run up to a possible reform, it is necessary to gauge if citizens prefer to have more disposable income than tax credits, and if European countries with high levels of VAT and social security payments have lower levels of employment, and more generous social services.

Diego Sánchez. Professor. IE University

1 April 2014

Should we be optimistic or pessimistic about the Spanish economy? It depends on how you look at it. It also depends on the steps taken next to consolidate the newly found strength of exports and to strengthen the private sector by lowering taxes and deregulating the labor market to make it more flexible.

Yolanda Regodón. Associate Director of Communications. IE Business School

31 March 2014

New York Fashion Week shows how collaboration between key players in fashion and politics can generate excellent results.

Antonio Montes. Director International Development. IE Business School

25 February 2014

This year Brazil is facing a much greater challenge than having to organize the World Cup. It also has to lay the foundations that will enable it to really become the world’s fifth greatest economic power.

Cristina de Haro. Professor. IE Business School

25 February 2014

The incipient economic recovery we are now seeing could be derailed if deflation raises its ugly head. One way to stop this from happening is to invest in R&D to raise productivity levels.

Ignacio de la Torre. Professor. IE Business School

6 February 2014

The storm that is breaking in emerging economies bears a striking resemblance to that of February 2007, when the first symptoms of the subprime crisis began to appear.

Ignacio de la Torre. Professor. IE Business School

14 January 2014

My six predictions for 2014 are summarized in a seventh: namely that it will be a good year for the world economy, and especially for Spain, which will actually grow more than the government says.

Ignacio de la Torre. Professor. IE Business School

18 December 2013

Although the US still hasn’t signed up to the Kyoto Protocol it is performing better than Europe in terms of CO2 emissions, thanks to the free market model it applies to companies prospecting for natural resources.

Rafael Pampillón. Professor. IE Business School

3 December 2013

Spain came out of recession in the third quarter, and next year we are likely to see a greater rise in consumerism that will hopefully set in motion a virtuous circle of rising levels of production and employment.

Ignacio de la Torre. Professor. IE Business School

7 November 2013

How can you justify the fact that the average Spanish worker has to work 21 days in order to earn what a Spanish CEO gets for one hour’s work? The answer is that right now you can’t.

Antonio Montes. Director of International Development. IE Business School

1 October 2013

Challenges lie ahead for the party that wins the elections set to take place in Chile in November, challenges that date back to the country’s dictatorship. 

Antonio Montes. Director of International Development. IE Business School

1 September 2013

Mexico looks like it is set to be the new Brazil, and Peña Nieto has taken over the helm with the clear objective of making it happen. Nevertheless, we have to ask ourselves if he really will manage to do it this time.

César Larraín. Minister-Counselor. Embassy of Peru in Spain

27 June 2013

The Multi-Party Trade Agreement (MTA) between the EU and Peru and Colombia provides a base for judicial stability in economic and trade exchanges between the different countries aimed at generating productive investment, preferential access to markets and the transfer of technology and innovation. 

Ignacio de la Torre. Professor. IE Business School

25 June 2013

The Asian giant is turning out to have feet of clay that threaten to muddy the walkways of a large part of the planet from Oceania to Africa, not forgetting Latin America.

Gonzalo Garland. Professor. IE Business School

15 May 2013

Japan’s latest attempts to exit the crisis using expansive policies, coupled with the problem of its ageing population, should be watched closely by the rest of the world.

Ignacio de la Torre. Professor. IE Business School

14 May 2013

In order to build a world with less systemic risk, it is essential to use long-term tools to enable savings to reach the real economy.

Ignacio de la Torre. Professor. IE Business School

31 March 2013

The controversy now surrounding Pescanova and the differences between its version of its profit and loss account and how the Bank and Spain sees it have once again put creative accounting on the front page.

Ignacio de la Torre. Professor. IE Business School

19 March 2013

The export boom has added nine points to Spain’s GDP in record time because Spain’s exporters have not only managed to maintain levels of productivity in the good years, but also raise them in very difficult times. 

Francisco López Lubián. Professor. IE Business School

28 February 2013

When governments cut subsidies for renewable energy producers, it resulted in surplus capacity that will force the sector to downsize and be more competitive in terms of production costs.

Ignacio de la Torre. Professor. IE Business School

27 February 2013

The dire actions and insatiable greed of some of our leaders will mean that they will go down in history as people with no sense of honor whatsoever.

Juan Carlos Martínez Lázaro. Professor. IE Business School

26 February 2013

The day that the Spanish stop viewing corruption through the prism of political struggle and see it as stealing taxpayer’s money, we may have a chance of putting an end to it.

Rafael Pampillón. Professor. IE Business School

2 January 2013

Although the Spanish economy will continue to shrink this year, some imbalances are already starting to even out.

Rafael Pampillón. Professor. IE Business School

18 December 2012

The figures tell us that the Spanish pension system needs some kind of stimulus if it is to survive, and the only way to provide it is through productivity.

Juan Carlos Martínez Lázaro. Professor. IE Business School

11 December 2012

New studies suggest that the Arctic ice cap could disappear over the next three or four summers, which could have significant economic and political consequences.

Juan Carlos Martínez Lázaro. Professor. IE Business School

28 November 2012

Colombia offers political stability, a macroeconomic landscape, and good perspectives for growth - which is exactly what Spain cannot offer at the moment.

Patricia Gabaldón

18 September 2012

The nanny state is telling its children it’s time they became more independent by creating their own companies and jobs.

Patricia Gabaldón. Professor. IE Business School

19 July 2012

The hypothetical decision to bring back the peseta would not address the real problems currently dragging Spain down, namely its level of competitiveness. All it would do is put off the inevitable, and meantime we have a lot to lose.

Gayle Allard. Professor. IE Business School

12 July 2012

We keep hearing about “flexible” and “rigid” labor markets, but what do these terms mean exactly? Does any one model work better than others?

Ignacio de la Torre. Professor. IE Business School

2 July 2012

The threat of a new recession in the US, the drop in the price of raw materials, and decisions taken by the ECB, might just bring about a turnaround in the world economy.

Gayle Allard. Professor. IE Business School

16 May 2012

Spain’s senseless labor market system means that employers do not take on new workers even if they need to, and employees are resigned to doing more for less for fear of losing their job.

Ignacio de la Torre. Professor. IE Business School

16 May 2012

Behavioral finance has a marked short-term impact on markets, but the price of assets will always depend more on efficiency levels in the long run.

Fernando Fernández. Professor. IE Business School

16 May 2012

One of the most widespread fallacies is that education can only be improved by throwing more public money at it. Here are four ways to improve education in Spain without spending a single extra Euro.

Patricia Gabaldón. Professor. IE Business School

16 May 2012

Women have achieved higher levels of participation in political power in Latin America than any other world region. But the lives of Latin America outside the upper echelons of power are very different.

Fernando Fernández. Professor. IE Business School

13 April 2012

Financial reform in Spain has mutated several times over the last few years. But, just like light, it has always stuck to the same straight line of action.

Patricia Gabaldón. Professor. IE Business School

14 February 2012

Economic reactivation is the best way to eradicate unemployment, get the deficit under control and get credit moving again. In order to achieve this, the government first has to inspire confidence.

Miguel Ángel Muñoz Luna. Professor. IE Business School

10 January 2012

Finding out that 43% of the world’s wealth is in the hands of 1% of the population is bad enough, but the fact that this wealth level is rising in spite of the crisis makes it even more unacceptable.

Fernando Fernández. Professor. IE Business School

12 December 2011

Forget about short cuts and soft measures: Europe’s problem is that it has lost the market’s confidence, and in order to get it back it will have to take some hard measures.

Fernando Fernández. Professor. IE Business School

15 November 2011

The IMF’s absurd proposal to buy debt from threatened European countries like Spain or Italy would have made it into a hedge fund, and it would have been developing countries that paid the price.

Fernando Fernández. Professor. IE Business School

14 October 2011

Those who favor a reduction in interest rates and expansion policies as a solution to the crisis are wrong. The only way out is to recognize losses, even if means being poor, and to start from scratch.

Fernando Fernández. Professor. IE Business School

13 September 2011

The IMF has given us a lesson in transparency by publishing the contract with its new director, Christine Lagarde. It has set an example that our public employees would do well to follow.

Ignacio de la Torre. Professor. IE Business School

7 July 2011

The current crisis has once again shown how wrong economic forecasts often are. So why is it such a deeply flawed profession?

Fernando Fernández. Professor. IE Business School

7 July 2011

Alfredo Pérez Rubalcaba is at risk of becoming the Kaká of Spanish politics, seeing how he is rendered transferable before he even makes his debut.

Fernando Fernández. Professor. IE Business School

14 June 2011

Neither the left nor the right. Nobody dares to defend economic liberalism any more, even though it is essential to defend the welfare state that liberals like so much.

Ignacio de la Torre. Professor. IE Business School

14 June 2011

The uprisings in the North of Africa are basically the result of the rising price of food, which is pushing emerging countries further into poverty, and raising levels of geopolitical risk.

Fernando Fernández. Professor. IE Business School

12 May 2011

The current Spanish government has descended into a chaos of incoherence and frivolity. Meanwhile the country seems more concerned about Ronaldo’s goals and celeb gossip.

Enrique Dans. Professor. IE Business School

12 May 2011

The Sustainable Economy Law has turned out to be the most unsustainable of regulations because of its most controversial point, designed to defend an industry that wants to stymie innovation in order to maintain its privileged position.

José María O´Kean. Professor. IE Business School

12 April 2011

Lack of competitiveness is the biggest problem facing the Spanish economy, and in order to address it we have to commit to the digital revolution and to training programs for workforces.

Valentín Bote. Professor. IE Business School

9 March 2011

Spain’s pension reform is a move in the right direction, having upped both the retirement age and social security contributions. It’s the only way to keep the current intergenerational system going.

Fernando Fernández. Professor. IE Business School

9 March 2011

José Luís Rodríguez Zapatero has started to apply much-needed reforms, even if it is because he hasn’t much choice. But it is clear that reforms in Spain still have a long way to go.

Juan Carlos Martínez Lázaro. Professor. IE Business School

10 February 2011

The rising price of oil threatens to scupper the ECB’s monetary policy by fuelling inflation, placing the Eurozone’s recovery in danger.

David Bach. Professor. IE Business School

10 February 2011

Germany has scored more economic goals than Spain because it applied the structural reforms needed before the crisis took hold, and because Merkel, has controlled spending from the start.

Fernando Fernández. Professor. IE Business School

10 February 2011

After losing almost three years, Zapatero has finally accepted that Spain is in the grip of a serious crisis. The problem now is that he lacks the credibility and legitimacy to tackle it.

María del Pilar Galeote. Professor. IE Law School

10 January 2011

China’s growing presence in Latin America is a reality, but is only half the story. Now it´s time for Latin America to do the same in China.

José María Fidalgo. Professor. IE Business School

10 January 2011

Unemployment has driven many Spanish families to despair. What they need to inspire them to fight for a better future is a national plan based on strengthening SMEs and added value in business.

Rafael Pampillón. Professor. IE Business School

4 November 2010

General budgets are too optimistic in terms of both income and expenditure, resulting in a greater deficit than previously thought, which means the government will have to issue more debt.

Rafael Pampillón. Professor. IE Business School

5 October 2010

Economic recovery worldwide will help lift Spain out of the crisis, but in order to avoid problems in the future we need to accompany improvement with a change of model.

Rafael Puyol. Vicepresident. IE Foundation

5 October 2010

In just under two decades India will be the most populated country on the planet. This translates into enormous potential, but deep changes are required in order to leverage it well.

Gayle Allard. Professor. IE Business School

7 September 2010

After just 8 years of circulation the Euro has the dark side that Spain didn’t want to see when it took over from the weakened peseta. What we need now is real improvement in levels of competitiveness.

Rafael Pampillón. Professor. IE Business School

7 June 2010

Low birth rates coupled with a growing life expectancy paint a picture of the future that requires immediate measures to guarantee Spain’s social security system.

Miguel Hernández. Professor. IE Business School

7 June 2010

It is the million dollar question of the moment. Just how are banks going to deal with all the properties they now have on their books without losing too much money?

José Marí O´Kean. Professor. IE Business School

29 April 2010

The economic crisis has taught us an important lesson, namely that increases in wealth have to be based on real business, not on rises in the price of financial assets.

Rafael Pampillón. Professor. IE Business School

7 April 2010

One of the major landmarks of the 20th century has been China’s spectacular awakening, but the country now faces a series of challenges that will require deep change to maintain rates of growth.

Bárbara Huerta. Professor. IE Business School

4 March 2010

Real estate promoters have been largely responsible for the crisis that has affected their sector so badly, and now they are finding out exactly where their business plans went wrong.

Fernando Fernández. Professor. IE Business School

4 March 2010

Latin America is advancing, but there are still irresponsible leaders in Venezuela and Argentina that are also affecting oil-dependent satellite states.

Fernando Fernández. Professor. IE Business School

2 February 2010

As the decline of macroeconomic indicators finally starts to ease, some can now see light at the end of a tunnel. But we are not out of the woods yet.

Javier Carrillo. Professor. IE Business School

2 February 2010

The inability to reach an international agreement which would bring continuity to the current Kyoto Protocol is incomprehensible, from both an environmental and business perspective.

Gonzalo Garland. Professor. IE Business School

7 January 2010

The dollar is at an all time low, and everything points to it continuing to show signs of weakness over the next few months. Is this the beginning of the end of its reign?

Pablo Martín de Holan. Professor. IE Business School

4 December 2009

As weird as this may sound, the Nobel Prize for Economics does not exist. Alfred Nobel, the man who discovered dynamite and then eased his conscience by creating the most prestigious awards in the world, did not include this particular science for reasons best known to himself…

Juan Pablo Vázquez Sampere. Professor. IE Business School

5 October 2009

Governments can be the best marketing managers in the world using the broad range of tools they have at their disposal to influence consumers. In Spain, the need to start focusing on “retailers” (workers) rather than “wholesalers” (banks and businesses).

Juan Carlos Martínez Lázaro. Professor. IE Business School

5 October 2009

The reality of the unemployment situation in Spain has returned following the disappearance of the mirage created over the summer. Unemployment will continue to grow as long as the government and unions fail to understand the need to reform our production structure.

Juan Luis Manfredi. Professor. IE School of Communication/IE University

7 September 2009

The crisis in the communication sector in turn threatens to weaken democracy and calls for a shakeup to eliminate the dual funding of public television.

Rafael Puyol. Vicepresident. IE Foundation

7 September 2009

Soaring unemployment figures in Spain are hitting jobs across the board, but certain factors make it more likely to affect specific people and sectors.

Antonio Rivela and Ignacio de la Torre. Professors. IE Business School

2 June 2009

In spite of the real estate bubble, Spain has suffered relatively little fallout from subprime mortgages. Is that because they don’t exist? They exist alright, but they are well controlled.

Miguel Herrero de Jáuregui. Professor. IE School of Arts & Humanities

2 June 2009

In the light of recent events the dogmas of economic theory have been brought into question, with perhaps one exception: free competition, as defended by the Ancient Greeks.

Rafael Puyol. Professor. IE Business School

2 June 2009

The increase in immigration carving a new ethnic map of Spain comprised of the many different attributes of the foreigners who apply for Spanish nationality.

Miguel Aguirre Marzo. Professor. IE Business School

5 May 2009

It’s a catch 22 situation. There’s no trade without funding and there’s no funding without insurance. It’s time to organize incentive schemes for credit insurance.

Gayle Allard. Professor. IE Business School

2 April 2009

When the leaders of 19 of the world´s largest economies and the European Union meet in London April 2 faced with the worst economic data the world has seen since the 1930s, they will be deeply divided over how to face the crisis.

Manuel Bermejo. Professor. IE Business School

1 April 2009

The long honeymoon that the Spanish economy has enjoyed means that many senior managers have not yet had to rise to the challenge of a crisis. The moment has come for a complete change of the way we think and manage.

Javier Carrillo. Professor. IE Business School

1 April 2009

Green stands for hope as Governments worldwide start to consider new economic development models based on energy saving and clean technologies.

Ignacio de la Vega. Professor. IE Business School

11 February 2009

One rescue plan after another, millions and millions pledged, screaming headlines... but the real solution to the economic crisis lies in granting immediate and effective aid to SMEs.

Gayle Allard. Professor. IE Business School

9 January 2009

Exceptional times require exceptional measures, such as deploying an arsenal of fiscal measures. It’s the only way to combat the current economic crisis.

Rafael Pampillón. Professor. IE Business School

9 January 2009

Spain has the same symptoms as those that preceded the Great Depression. And just like then, the only way forward is to facilitate loans and increase public spending.

Manuel Bermejo. Professor. IE Business School

9 December 2008

The explanations offered by economists for the financial crisis only serve to understand how the whole house of cards fell down... but the earthquake that caused the collapse is a crisis of values that affects us all.

José Mª O´Kean. Professor. IE Business School

6 November 2008

The financial crisis has led to a raft of measures by governments across the world. Most are correct but insufficient.

José María O´Kean. Professor. IE Business School

11 September 2008

Except for the odd diehard, nobody is denying that we are facing a credit crisis that is affecting the mainstream economy. The question is: Where do we go from here?

José María O´Kean. Professor. IE Business School

1 July 2008

No actually. For years, Trichet could have put the brakes on the real estate bubble by raising interest rates. But Germany and France had other priorities. So what do we do now?

Rafael Pampillón. Professor. IE Business School

6 May 2008

From October2007, the amount of money immigrants in Spain send back to their home countries has been steadily falling due to economic slowdown here.

<a href="http://www.ie.edu/IE/php/en/profesores_medios_detalle.php?id=305">Javier Carrillo. Professor. IE Business School</a>

1 April 2008

Renewable energies are revolutionizing the world energy scenario, bringing excellent business opportunities in Latin America, Asia and the US.

Rafael Pampillón. Professor. IE Business School

4 March 2008

The economic miracle built on construction-fuelled employment and consumerism is over. Construction has fallen, shaking the pillars of the virtuous circle.

Rafael Pampillón. Professor. IE Business School

6 February 2008

The global downturn has reached Spain, calling for serious structural reform and cutbacks in public spending to maintain levels of competitiveness.

<a href="http://www.ie.edu/IE/php/en/profesores_medios_detalle.php?id=303">Gonzalo Garland. Professor. IE Business School</a>

10 January 2008

Some analysts believe Spain is playing a key role in building relations between Asia and Latin America. That may be so, but we need to examine some aspects of this role in greater detail.

<a href="http://www.ie.edu/eng/sobreie/sobreie_expertos_detalle.asp?id_exp=302">Rafael Pampillón</a>. Professor. IE Business School

3 December 2007

China, the Asian giant, has made the continent an investment magnet. The next stop is for the countries to join forces.

Rafael Pampillón. Professor. IE Business School

31 October 2007

Foreign direct investment is breaking all the records, to the extent that it has already passed levels recorded in 2000.

<a href="http://www.ie.edu/eng/sobreie/sobreie_expertos_detalle.asp?id_exp=352">Juan Carlos Martínez</a>. Professor. IE Business School

27 September 2007

The last five years have seen major advances in Brazil that have led to massive investment there by Spanish companies. Now all Spanish firms need to do is increase their exports to Brazil.

Hugo Dixon. CEO and founder of Breakingviews.com

3 July 2007

On May 31 Hugo Dixon, CEO and founder of Breakingviews.com, took part in the 2007 World Affairs Seminar of the Master of International Legal Practice with an address on global finance and the liquidity game, a summary of which can be found in IE Focus.

Rafael Pampillón. Professor. IE Business School

3 July 2007

The Latin American economy continues to grow at a rapid pace although predictions for 2007 show some slowing in growth. The question lies in whether this growth will continue in the future or whether social and political instability as well as a cooling of the US economy is going to have greater effect than expected.

<a href="http://www.ie.edu/eng/sobreie/sobreie_expertos_detalle.asp?id_exp=352">Juan Carlos Martínez Lázaro</a>. Professor. IE Business School

30 May 2007

The biggest threat this year to world economic growth could come from the dispute over Iran’s nuclear programme.

Juan Carlos Martínez Lázaro. Professor. IE Business School

27 February 2007

China’s growing leadership in the world economy has led it to adopt a pragmatic foreign policy: Be commercial friends with everyone.

Juan Luis Martínez and Víctor Torre. Professors. IE Business School

1 February 2007

Because cultural activities are such an important part of European lives today, the private sector should play a larger role in providing them.

Rafael Pampillón. Professor. IE Business School

31 January 2007

If Fidel Castro dies soon, what are the options for Cuba after almost half a century of military government?

Manuel Bermejo. Professor. IE Business School

5 January 2007

Today’s rapidly changing business environment poses an array of new challenges for SMEs.. As key economic players, SMEs must learn to clear new hurdles.

Rafael Puyol. Professor. IE Business School

28 November 2006

Newspapers carry stories every day on the growing inflow of immigrants into Spain, raising concerns over the country’s ability to absorb the new arrivals. But a lot of what we hear about immigration is myth.

Juan Carlos Martínez. Professor. IE Business School

27 October 2006

The world economy is growing, despite the high price of crude oil and raw materials. But it also faces other threats that could flare up at any time.

Rafael Pampillón. Professor. IE Business School

5 September 2006

As Eastern European countries knock on the EU door for entry, many members of the single currency are suffering from growing pains. Will membership of the Euro-zone bring prosperity to new members?

Fernando Aparicio. Professor. IE Business School

30 May 2006

As business becomes increasingly global, third-party arbitration offers a quick and efficient way to resolve the cross-border disputes involving information systems and arising from the growing use of the Internet.

Gayle Allard. Professor. Instituto de Empresa

4 May 2006

Europe’s public pension system is in dire straits--the victim of changing demographics and high unemployment. If Europe fails to boost its personal saving rate, retirement pensions for future generations will be in jeopardy.

Rafael Pampillón. Professor. Instituto de Empresa

4 May 2006

If Spain fails to curb inflation, it stands to lose competitiveness on the European and world markets. And if imports continue to grow faster than exports, the country’s trade deficit will widen to alarming levels. What can be done to stave off a crisis?

José María O'Kean. Professor. Instituto de Empresa

21 March 2006

In the past, Spain always had the option of devaluating it currency when it needed to restore competitiveness. But with the euro this is no longer possible. What then, is Spain to do in order to gain a competitive edge over its trading partners?

Juan Carlos Martínez. Professor. Instituto de Empresa

22 February 2006

For Spanish companies with investments in Latin America, the last decade has provided an often difficult learning experience. But the author believes Spain and Latin American have both profited from close economic ties and will continue to benefit in the future.

Juan Carlos Martínez Lázaro. Professor. Instituto de Empresa

9 January 2006

Household debt has grown sharply in Spain in recent years, boosted by increased consumer confidence and low mortgage rates. But recently, the European Central Bank moved to hike its key interest rate by one-quarter-percent to 2..25%.

Marie-José Garot. Professor. Instituto de Empresa

31 October 2005

China is seeking to re-enforce its military power and foster economic growth without jeopardising its relationship with leading trade partners. It’s a delicate balancing act that illustrates how dependent China is on a stable international economy.

José Luis Álvarez. Professor. Instituto de Empresa

26 September 2005

The gulf between the priorities of the Spanish people and those of its government appears to be widening by the day. While the man on the street worries about unemployment, terrorism and housing prices, the government is caught up with initiatives of limited interest to the general population, such as the Alliance of Civilizations and gay marriages. Meanwhile, the government is paying scant attention to economic policy.

Rafael Pampillón. Professor. Instituto de Empresa

5 September 2005

Who in 2003 bumped France from fourth place in the world ranking of exporting countries? The answer is China, a country that is now positioned just behind the U.S.A., Germany and Japan in the ranking of world exporters.

Juan Carlos Martínez-Lázaro. Professor. Instituto de Empresa

28 June 2005

Two thousand four could be called a transition year for Spain’s economy - not so much for economic changes, but because of the new government that came in after elections on 14 March.

Rafael Pampillón. Director. Area Economic Environment. Instituto de Empresa

18 May 2005

The brain drain is nothing new; people have always been lured across borders by fatter paychecks. But globalization is making it worse.

Juan Carlos Martínez Lázaro. Professor Economic Environment. Instituto de Empresa

29 March 2005

Last year was a good one for the economy, marred only by the rise in oil prices. Predictions for 2005, thanks to contributions from the emerging economies, look rosy, too. Effects of higher oil prices seem to have been absorbed.

Isabelle Birambaux. Correspondent. Dernières Nouvelles d'Alsace

29 March 2005

The Airbus A380, recently unveiled in Toulouse, is a symbol of European industrial achievement. Seating 555, the A380 is the largest passenger aircraft ever built. Its creation is the result of a desire to build a strong Europe, independent of the United States, especially in key sectors like aeronautics.

Stefanie Müller. Correspondent. Handelsblatt

21 February 2005

In times of crisis the French need the Germans more than ever.

Rafael Pampillón. Director. Economy Area. Instituto de Empresa

17 February 2005

Many Spaniards dislike politics, especially the defence policy of U.S. President George W. Bush. But that doesn’t mean Spaniards are anti-American.

José Mª O’Kean. Professor. Instituto de Empresa

1 February 2005

After their election, new governments usually enjoy a honeymoon period - but only for the first six months or so. Spain’s new leaders have defined a political strategy in which the economy is to be given scant importance

Rafael Puyol. Executive Vice President. Fundación Instituto de Empresa

1 January 2005

A changing population has made Spain concerned with demographic matters.

Javier Carrillo. Professor. Instituto de Empresa

1 January 2005

The U.S. fiscal policy is shaky. What will happen if this house of cards collapses?

Rafael Pampillón. Director. Economic Area. Instituto de Empresa

1 December 2004

How the modest meat-based sandwich can serve as a guide to understanding complex monetary matters.

Juan Carlos Martínez Lázaro. Professor at Instituto de Empresa

18 October 2004

What effect will skyrocketing prices of crude oil have on global monetary systems?

Rafael Pampillón. Director of the Economic Environment Area. Instituto de Empresa

26 July 2004

Spain grants soft loans to other States under favorable, or concessional, conditions to finance projects for social and economic development. Called Spanish Development Assistance Funds (FADs), they are the nation’s most important political instrument for cooperation and development.

Gonzalo Garland. International Relations Director. Instituto de Empresa

22 June 2004

China is growing at a dizzying rate, and already playing a more important role on the international stage.

Rafael Pampillón. Director. Economic Environment Area. Instituto de Empresa

18 June 2004

Why does the U.S. generate more employment than Europe? Why has competitiveness fallen in France, Germany and Italy? Why are the Germans trimming their welfare state? The author tackles these questions.

Rafael Pampillón. Professor. Instituto de Empresa

25 May 2004

China’s economic success story is much on the minds of investors, managers and academics around the world.

Rafael Pampillón. Professor. Instituto de Empresa

21 April 2004

Does it matter where a company has its head office? What economic difference does it make to the nation playing host to production facilities or headquarters?

Rafael Pampillón. Professor. Instituto de Empresa

25 March 2004

Prof. Pampillon explains that the challenges facing the Spain's socialist government include the tasks of improving productivity processes, streamlining economic structures, removing barriers to the creation of new businesses, making more development land available, stimulating technological advancement and maintaining the budget surplus.

Manuel Romera. Professor. Instituto de Empresa

24 March 2004

Spain is different from its neighbors in town-planning legislation. Its autonomous regions (ARs) and local corporations are responsible for regulating land use. Recently, the government has tried to increase the amount of land on offer, but has had a hard time implementing changes.

Javier Carrillo. Professor. Instituto de Empresa

22 March 2004

Latest results suggest that since 1996, Spain’s strong economy has put it on a path where it is now converging with Europe in employment growth, the unemployment rate, youth unemployment and long-term unemployment.

Rafael Pampillón. Professor. Instituto de Empresa

18 March 2004

Recently we witnessed protests by workers from public shipyards, motivated by lack of accord on a new collective bargaining agreement and demand for orders to guarantee their future.

Angel Cabrera. Dean. Instituto de Empresa

19 February 2004

Back in Madrid from the World Economic Summit, even before his nose had time to thaw out, the Dean’s students began asking him about the talking points in Davos this year.

José Luis Guajardo. Professor. Instituto de Empresa

18 February 2004

Few concepts in economy are so poorly interpreted and little known as “competitiveness”. The author provides us with a reality check.

Rafael Pampillón. Professor. Instituto de Empresa

26 January 2004

Though global economic predictions for the coming year appear rosy, the author sees some possible clouds on the horizon.

Rafael Pampillón. Professor. Instituto de Empresa

23 December 2003

If present imbalances continue, Spain’s neighbor could be the first country forced to give up the euro. The author suggests ways Portugal can avoid an untimely exit from the Eurozone

Stefanie Müller. Correspondent. Wirschaftswöche

23 November 2003

To finance care for the elderly, Spaniards are thinking about a state insurance plan along German lines.

Gayle Allard. Professor. Instituto de Empresa

22 November 2003

Is there a relationship between GDP and happiness? Has huge growth in GDP per head made us any happier? Studies suggest that for us to be happy, our economic policies should be reoriented.

Manuel Romera. Professor. Instituto de Empresa

26 October 2003

Debates have been buzzing recently around Spain’s supposed real-estate bubble, or price surge. Younger generations will have to work harder – and longer – than their parents to purchase a home.

Rafael Pampillón. Director of the Economic Environment Area at Instituto de Empresa

23 June 2003

What will Argentina’s new government do to right the nation’s chaotic financial situation?

Rafael Pampillón

27 May 2003

Harvard professor Gregory Mankiw was appointed last month as an economic adviser to George W. Bush. Mankiw is the author of two books – Principles of Economics and Macroeconomics – which are popular among economic students.

Stefanie Müller, Wirtschaftswoche correspondent in Madrid

22 May 2003

The German economy will probably not recover until 2004. Structural reforms are necessary, but the world’s top exporter also needs a strengthened U.S. market, as well as a more aggressive European monetary policy.

Rafael Pampillón

24 April 2003

The U.S. economic machine continues to roll, while Europe continues to lose competitiveness. For the EMU nations to catch up, they must reform their labor markets and do away with the welfare state.

Juan Fernández

20 April 2003

Latin America as a tourist location seems to be losing its charm. Without better security and first-rate sanitation, it will be difficult to regain its appeal. Until a few years ago, Brazil and the Dominican Republic, for example, were two countries with high tourist demand. In 2002, the number of international tourists there fell by 7.2 percent and 2.5 percent, respectively.

Rafael Pampillón

18 March 2003

Venezuela’s economy fell to record lows last year. Inflation, high interest rates, capital flight and excessive dependence on its oil are to blame. But that’s not all: a foreign debt crisis could be looming.

By Stefanie Müller, Wirtschaftswoche correspondent in Madrid

19 February 2003

There is a generalized crisis in the German retail sector. Only discounters are doing land-office business. German consumers are taking their revenge out on Euro-criminals

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